~*{kira kira burogu}*~
To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you

also

what

when

why

how

look

because

never

stop

shesworevengeance:

To the people who are supportive, reliable and loving partners of people with depression and other mental illnesses, rock on my friends. You deserve all of the awards. It is never ending and never easy, but (hopefully) always worth it. You are sooo damn appreciated, even if your partner doesn’t tell you (often). 

Reblog if you are in one of this fandoms

cottoncanndie:

I noticed in all those fandoms post they miss many awesome fandoms, so reblog if you see your fandom here (if not, add it)

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lemonsharks:

cakejam:

”explain your answer”

image

Explain your answer is one of the most important things you do in school and one of the only things that carries over into the non-academia workforce.

Critical thinking is important.

teacher talk time!

if you give me an answer, i don’t know whether you a.} actually know the material, or b.} made a lucky guess. as a {future} teacher, it’s my job to make certain all of my students understand what i have to teach them. i can’t do that if i don’t know whether you understand or not.

so when a teacher/professor asks you to explain your answer, we are checking to see whether a.} you actually know this stuff, b.} you were paying attention in class, and c.} you put some thought into your answer. if nothing else, it gives us peace of mind {and with the way education is today, at least in america, any peace of mind teachers can get is a godsend}.

and as lemonsharks said, it carries over to the workforce. we’re asking you to go above and beyond - to exercise what we call HOTS, higher-order thinking skills. to go deeper into the knowledge. to analyze it further. no matter what profession you find yourself in, analysis will be a part of it. you will have to use your HOTS to come up with answers, new solutions, innovations, etc. by asking you to explain your answer, we’re getting you to exercise your HOTS muscles and make them stronger. plus, you have to be accountable for your decisions. some bosses/jobs might be more open to the “idk i just like the feel of using a over b.” however, there are jobs where that’s not the case. let’s say you’re part of the committee deciding which standardized test your state is going to adopt. {a very pertinent question right now in education, what with common core and all.} you literally cannot stand there in front of the state department of education and say something like, “smarter balance feels better than park. idk why, but i think it is.” you will get laughed all the way to the unemployment line.

i hate seeing “explain” at the end of a question just as much as you do, and i still go “eugh” every time. for a long time i thought “now just why in the hell do i need to tell you how i know the correct answer if i got it right?” but when i started on my path to being an educator, i realized that asking someone to explain their answer {even if i already think i know their explanation} teaches them to think for themselves, to always have a rationale, and to push their thinking higher. teachers are not just here to tell you who robert frost was, or why the bastille was stormed, or why -5+-5=-10 or where your pancreas is located. we’re here to give you life skills.

tl;dr: explaining your thinking is important, and i managed to throw in a bonus education acronym for you guys. :D

lemonsharks:

envygreenpencilred:

star-anise:

last-snowfall:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

Seriously if this were a standard operating thing it would make my life so much easier in large groups and I am SO TOTALLY HAPPY for anyone and everyone else to use it, ever. Wearing these badges will not cause me to assume you are autistic, but it will help me figure out whether/how the fuck to communicate with you (and let me tell YOU how/whether to communicate with ME in a way that makes everybody comfortable).

I have social anxiety, and I would LOVE if everybody wore these.  I spend a lot of time at cons working myself up into a frenzy about, “That person looks so cool!  But but but, they’re talking with their friends a lot, maybe they don’t want to be approached by randos.  I should just crawl back into a hole where I belong.  …WAIT, that’s my brain being a rabid bobcat.  Um, maybe if I catch them when they’re alone…?”
Instead, I could just LOOK AT THEIR BADGE and not have to have more panic attacks than is strictly necessary.

Oh my god YES and then I would have a visual indicator that I am totally interested in talking but totally awful at it.

Oh my god these make my anxious heart swell with joy

lemonsharks:

envygreenpencilred:

star-anise:

last-snowfall:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

Seriously if this were a standard operating thing it would make my life so much easier in large groups and I am SO TOTALLY HAPPY for anyone and everyone else to use it, ever. Wearing these badges will not cause me to assume you are autistic, but it will help me figure out whether/how the fuck to communicate with you (and let me tell YOU how/whether to communicate with ME in a way that makes everybody comfortable).

I have social anxiety, and I would LOVE if everybody wore these.  I spend a lot of time at cons working myself up into a frenzy about, “That person looks so cool!  But but but, they’re talking with their friends a lot, maybe they don’t want to be approached by randos.  I should just crawl back into a hole where I belong.  …WAIT, that’s my brain being a rabid bobcat.  Um, maybe if I catch them when they’re alone…?”

Instead, I could just LOOK AT THEIR BADGE and not have to have more panic attacks than is strictly necessary.

Oh my god YES and then I would have a visual indicator that I am totally interested in talking but totally awful at it.

Oh my god these make my anxious heart swell with joy

snh-snh-snh:

I keep thinking oh man, I’m so immature. How am I allowed to be an adult.

Then I spend time with teenagers.

And it’s like, wow, okay, yeah. I am an adult. I am so adult. Look at me adulting all over the place.

spend all day with middle schoolers.

gives a whole new definition to ‘herding cats’. 

wee medicine stuff!

Read More

mystiqueetoile:

She’s in the mirror like “what up beautiful, I’m so happy to see you!”

mystiqueetoile:

She’s in the mirror like “what up beautiful, I’m so happy to see you!”

septemberism94:

schim:

Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.

It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)

http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)

I wasn’t going to reblog this until I read the important caption dang thank you!!!

dressurchic:

I love this horse so much- Edward and Glock’s Undercover
Pic from the Glock Facebook page :)

dressurchic:

I love this horse so much- Edward and Glock’s Undercover

Pic from the Glock Facebook page :)